SPOILER ALERT

IF IT SEEMS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT PROBABLY IS

There is a wise old saying ‘if it is seems too good to be true, it probably is’.

 

Unfortunately in the art world, some people don’t believe that wise old saying.  

 

I sometimes wonder where the privileged idea of buying a piece of paper with some kind of drawing on it will (guaranteed, without any supporting historic data) appreciate in value and as a consumer you will have the benefit of being an art ‘investor’.  Sadly the more outrageous the claim of exponential growth in potential value of said asset, the more it becomes attractive to some people who seem to forget the wise old saying.  And they of all people should know better.

 

You see the reason is simple.  These people do not buy the art-they are sold the art.  Big difference.

 

There are 738,000 artists listed on various art websites offering their works for sale.  There are lots of galleries listing works for sale.  There are lots of private dealers listing works for sale.  There are more auctions every day around the world with art being sold in them you cannot keep track.

 

The motivational factor behind most people who want to sell their artwork is because they originally acquired the work as an ‘investment’. I can mention this because I hear it nearly every day.

 

Where did the expectation come from that in order to have pretty pictures hanging in your home they need to be able to be sold at a profit at some point in the future when you get tired or bored with them?

 

Well great art in your home really makes your house your home and ‘your home is your castle’.  That’s another wise old saying.

 

I was told nearly 40 years ago when I bought my first Warhol that people sell their art because (as I mention on my website) of debt, divorce or death.  There is no mention of boredom or to pay back my pension or because the dealer told me it was the next best or hottest thing going.  With hundreds of thousands of artists creating art the chances of you picking a winner against the ‘dealer’ are probably pretty slim.  Unless of course the dealer or gallery (or business manager for the artist) has a vested interest in promoting the artist with either responsible, respectable efforts or something more insincere and manipulative.  You see I have learned that sometimes a business manager can be more of an artist than the actual artist but then that is another story for another time.  Was that the earth I just felt shake or something else?

June 12, 2020